AP-AM Prep-Cyber Corner

MORNING PREP - MORNING PREP - MORNING PREP - MORNING PREP

--------------------------

! CYBER CORNER !

--------------------------

IN THE NEWS: CARS MAY BE GETTING SMARTER

WASHINGTON (AP) — We have smartphones, smart TV's and smart everything else these days. So, why not a smart car? The government says it's possible someday we will — but don't go rushing off to your favorite dealer to place an order just yet. Federal transportation officials are hinting they will eventually require automakers to equip new vehicles with technology that lets cars warn each other if they are headed for danger. A radio signal would track a car's position, speed and other information — and share that with other nearby vehicles with similar technology. If two cars are on a collision course — the driver can be alerted — and in some cases, the cars might apply the brakes themselves. Any such action to have such devices installed, however, is still some years off.

___

Online:

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration —http://icsw.nhtsa.gov/safercar/ConnectedVehicles

IN THE NEWS: YOU TUBE VIDEO ALLEGING ABUSE LEADS TO CHARGES

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (AP) — Prosecutors in Southern California have arrested a school administrator who quit her job after a former student aired sexual abuse allegations on a YouTube video. The clip by the student has been viewed nearly a million times since it went online. In the clip, the former student places a phone call complaining to Andrea Cardosa that she abused the girl when she was 12 and Cardosa was her basketball coach. Prosecutors have charged her Cardosa with five counts of aggravated sexual assault on a child and 11 other counts of abuse. She could get life in prison.

ON THE WEB: TECH FIRMS RELEASE MORE INFO ABOUT GOVERNMENT SPYING

CYBERSPACE (AP) — They have been pressing for permission to do so. And now five major technology companies have released more information about U.S. government spying on the digital lives of people in the name of national security. The disclosures were made by companies like Facebook, Google and Microsoft — and the releases include secret court orders demanding emails and other online activities of people using those services. It's the first time the firms have been able to disclose the volume of U.S. government orders aimed at sniffing out would-be terror plots.

___

Online:

Google's disclosure: http://bit.ly/1aX9uFf

Microsoft's disclosure: http://bit.ly/1ekWklU

Yahoo's disclosure: http://bit.ly/LsbHfh

Facebook's disclosure: http://bit.ly/1nJLIQ2

LinkedIn's disclosure: http://bit.ly/MqxpBl

IN STORES: SUPER BOWL ONLINE RATINGS

NEW YORK (AP) — It's not just the TV ratings from the Super Bowl that matter these days. We're also being asked to take a peek at how many people checked out the big game on their small-screen devices. Fox says an average of 528,000 people watched the live Internet stream of Sunday's rout by the Seattle Seahawks over the Denver Broncos. The highest number of online viewers came at the end of the third quarter — when the game was well in hand for Seattle. It's perhaps an indication that people at Super Bowl parties or at home felt safe to check out other programming while monitoring the game online — or chose to mingle with others who weren't glued to the lopsided win. The number of Super Bowl related tweets was 24.9 million — up from 24.1 million such tweets last year.

by Oscar Wells Gabriel II

Oscar Gabriel can be reached at ogabriel@ap.org.